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Micki Abercrombie-Donahue, Ed. D. , Associate Dean and Associate Professor

Whitworth University School of Education

Dr. Micki Abercrombie-Donahue has been teaching in higher education since 2005 after serving in both public and private schools for 15 years. She is an Associate Dean of Graduate Education and an Associate Professor of Education in the Whitworth School of Education who began her teaching career working with English Language Learners in South Central Los Angeles. After teaching ELLs in Byelorussia while studying in a university level Russian and English Dual Immersion Program, she returned to teach language arts, social studies, and English Language Development at the middle school and high school levels in Montana and Washington State. During her doctoral studies, Dr. Abercrombie-Donahue worked to implement Indigenous languages, cultures, histories, knowledge, and literature into Montana schools in partnership with multiple tribal nations and schools. After earning her B.A. in Political Studies, an M.A. in History, and an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Montana State University with an emphasis in Multicultural and Multilingual Education, Abercrombie-Donahue taught Multicultural Education and Curriculum Development while serving as a language and literacy consultant. She currently teaches graduate courses in: Language Acquisition-Strategies for Developing Language Learners, Emergent Biliteracy, Middle School Literacy, Advanced Literacy, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Cultural Competency, Culturally Responsive Pedagogy, Curriculum Design and Assessment, and Educational Research Methods. Dr. Abercrombie-Donahue is a member of the National Association of Bilingual Education, the American Educational Research Association, and National Association of Multicultural Education. She consults with school districts and enjoys a research agenda that includes:

  1. The role of language and culture in shaping student educational experiences, the keys to adapting models of curriculum and instruction to meet the needs of underrepresented, multilingual, and multicultural students;
  2. The role of epistemology in shaping student performance in educational settings and best methods of implementing Indigenous epistemologies, languages, and pedagogies into classroom settings;
  3. The key elements to successful teaching and learning for DLLs in schools;
  4. The keys to developing cultural competency, cultural proficiency, critical inquiry, and reflection within pre-service teachers and educational practitioner populations;
  5. Teaching for change, instructional models of literacy and language education that promote equality of educational opportunity and student achievement.

Keynote address: TBA

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